Disruption of CXCR4 signaling in pharyngeal neural crest cells causes DiGeorge syndrome-like malformations - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles Development (Cambridge, England) Year : 2016

Disruption of CXCR4 signaling in pharyngeal neural crest cells causes DiGeorge syndrome-like malformations

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Abstract

DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is a congenital disease causing cardiac outflow tract anomalies, craniofacial dysmorphogenesis, thymus hypoplasia, and mental disorders. It results from defective development of neural crest cells (NCs) that colonize the pharyngeal arches and contribute to lower jaw, neck and heart tissues. Although TBX1 has been identified as the main gene accounting for the defects observed in human patients and mouse models, the molecular mechanisms underlying DGS etiology are poorly identified. The recent demonstrations that the SDF1/CXCR4 axis is implicated in NC chemotactic guidance and impaired in cortical interneurons of mouse DGS models prompted us to search for genetic interactions between Tbx1, Sdf1 (Cxcl12) and Cxcr4 in pharyngeal NCs and to investigate the effect of altering CXCR4 signaling on the ontogeny of their derivatives, which are affected in DGS. Here, we provide evidence that Cxcr4 and Sdf1 are genetically downstream of Tbx1 during pharyngeal NC development and that reduction of CXCR4 signaling causes misrouting of pharyngeal NCs in chick and dramatic morphological alterations in the mandibular skeleton, thymus and cranial sensory ganglia. Our results therefore support the possibility of a pivotal role for the SDF1/CXCR4 axis in DGS etiology.
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hal-01292472 , version 1 (23-03-2016)

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S. Escot, C. Blavet, Emmanuel Faure, S. Zaffran, Jean-Loup Duband, et al.. Disruption of CXCR4 signaling in pharyngeal neural crest cells causes DiGeorge syndrome-like malformations. Development (Cambridge, England), 2016, 143 (4), pp.582-588. ⟨10.1242/dev.126573⟩. ⟨hal-01292472⟩
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